Don’t Use PubMed as a Journal Whitelist

An important post from the Scholarly Open Access blog by Jeffrey Beall, University of Colorado. Why you cannot trust many publications in PubMed searches these days, but how to confirm trusted journal list by limiting your searching to just Medline. Know the difference. Peer-reviewed science journals appearing in the Medline database are curated by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) at the NIH (National Institutes of Health).

There is very little requirement for a journal to get its content indexed in the PubMed database however, and there is no curation process by the NLM.

Advertisements

The Science Rant: Cherry Picking and Bad Pharma: how Patients and Doctors are fooled by incomplete information on prescription drugs.

Bad Science is really not doing science right at all. If you cut corners or do not repeat an experiment to make sure it is reproducible, you can end up with egg on your face as a scientist. At best the target for teasing by your colleagues, or at worst, a person that is never trusted again in the science world.

Bad science may also occur when money is part of the motivation equation in the form of “for profit”. Unfortunately, that is the context where commercial Pharma research occurs, including their clinical trials. With shareholders to pay, there is a strong executive pressure to get the product developed and flying out of the pharmacy on Doctor’s prescription pads.

For all of us as Patients, this can have bad consequences. For our Doctors, they may be making prescription decisions based on information that is skewed or incomplete. They can be in a position where they cannot even get the full story on many of the drugs they must choose from. The Pharmacist will be in the same position as your Doctor. The problem that is keeping all three of us in the dark is reporting bias on the part of the drug developer. That is, under reporting of negative trial results, and basic cherry picking of trial results.

Read more about these problems in my blog post at TheScienceRant.com

If you are a medical student or practicing doctor now, how do you know the drugs you are prescribing actually work? Turns out you might often not have the full truth about all clinical trials pertaining to the drug in question. I recommend you read more here:

http://thesciencerant.blogspot.com/2013/07/cherry-picking-and-bad-pharma-how.html?m=1